Soothing Rose Facial Mask, Plus 7 Other Rose Recipes

Rose petals, oats, and rhassoul clay combine to make this wonderfully soothing and beautifully scented facial mask. Seven other rose petal recipes are included for more ideas on using this lovely herb.

Soothing Rose Facial Mask. Rose petals, oats, and rhassoul clay combine to make this wonderfully soothing and beautifully scented facial mask. Seven other rose petal recipes are included for more ideas on using this herb.

Back when I was taking my Botanical Skincare course, one of our assignments was to create a specialty facial product. Knowing that I had rose planned as the Herb of the Month for February, I set out to create something special with rose petals.

The result? A really fantastic treatment for the face with a base of rose petals, oats, and clay!

I had actually stopped using clay-based facial masks some time ago. I found them too harsh, drying, and irritating for my skin. However, I learned through the skincare course that I just needed to use a different kind of clay for my skin type!

My skin is really in the normal range, not too oily or too dry. But I am in my 30s, and that means that my skin is happier with more gentle treatments and a boost of moisture. The perfect clay for me is one called rhassoul. It gently exfoliates, tones, and firms skin without drying, making it a great clay for all skin types, even skin that’s beginning to age. Not that mine is. Ahem.

Oats also provide a bit of gentle exfoliation, along with soothing emollient properties. Rose petals lend their anti-inflammatory and astringent actions while imparting a wonderful scent. This really is a lovely mask to use when you want something simple yet luxurious for your face!

Soothing Rose Facial Mask

Soothing Rose Facial Mask 3. Rose petals, oats, and rhassoul clay combine to make this wonderfully soothing and beautifully scented facial mask. Seven other rose petal recipes are included for more ideas on using this herb.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links to materials and products used for this project at no additional cost to you.

Ingredients

*To make the powdered oats and rose petals, simply place quick or old fashioned oats, along with the dried rose petals, in a spice or coffee grinder, then process until powdered.

Instructions

  1. Combine the clay, powdered oats, and powdered rose petals in a small bowl and transfer to a sealed container for storage. I like to reuse small half-pint jars for this.
  2. To make the mask, take 2 teaspoons of the dry mixture and place in a small bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of chosen liquid and stir to make a paste.
  3. Wait a few minutes to check the consistency and add another teaspoon of liquid if needed so that the mask will spread easily. When I make this mask, I love using equal parts milk, honey, and rose water (about 1 teaspoon each). It’s lovely, and the rose water really increases the fragrance!
  4. Apply the mask in a thick layer to the face and neck, wait about 15 minutes, then gently rinse off using warm water and a soft washcloth. I like using quality microfiber washcloths, but any will do.
  5. Follow up with a light moisturizer or a few drops of jojoba oil while the skin is still damp.

Rose Facial Mask 4. Rose petals, oats, and rhassoul clay combine to make this wonderfully soothing and beautifully scented facial mask. Seven other rose petal recipes are included for more ideas on using this herb.

Another key step in the mask process is to invite your young children to share their thoughts on your appearance while the mask is on working its wonders. My two-year-old declared “Ew! Skusting!” with a turned up, crinkled nose. The others were equally as impressed.

Can I blame them? Ah, not so much, but the results are worth everyone’s funny looks!

7 More Rose Recipes

If you’d like to find more ways to put the wonderful rose to use in your home, try one of these recipes!

  • Rose water is typically made through steam distillation, but you can make a simplified rose water at home through the simple method of infusion.
  • Use fresh or dried rose petals to make a lovely sugar scrub with either lemon or lavender to compliment. You can even match the petal color to the complimenting herb!
  • Rose petals combine with loose black tea to make a rosy drink that’s both bold and delicate.
  • Rose-infused honey allows you to impart the gentle flavor of rose petals to tea, pancakes, ice cream, and any other place asking for a drizzle of honey.
  • Rose petals and essential oils scent this rose-infused solid perfume that’s free from any artificial fragrances.
  • Rose petal jelly is a classic way to enjoy the flavor of rose petals. You can even can it and enjoy the flavor all year long.
  • This simple Rose Petal Salve is boosted with the addition of rosehip seed oil, making it extra soothing and anti-inflammatory.

Soothing Rose Facial Mask 2

Do you use or make any facial products with rose?

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    8 Comments

      1. That’s exciting, Vicki! Enjoy the process. There’s so much fun and creativity that goes into herbal products. This recipe is a great one to start with since it’s so simple. Enjoy!

      1. Hi Airah. As long as the ingredients are dry, it won’t spoil. But I’d recommend using within 3-6 months since the rose petal with start to deteriorate faster once it’s ground.

    1. I have Indian clay can that b used instead of the clay u mentioned in the recipy (rhadsoul clay) and another qu: u said u can add any liquid of ur choice will ACV work ?

      1. Hi Marina! You can certainly switch clays if you’d like. Rhassoul is nice because it isn’t as drying and astringent as some other clays, but if there’s one you already use with good results, then certainly feel free to switch! And yes, any liquid will work for the mask. I haven’t tried apple cider vinegar myself, but some ladies use it as a toner on their skin, so I imagine it would work fine. I would probably dilute it with half water to try first. I’d love to hear how it works for you if you use it with the vinegar!

    2. Can you make the rose mask all ready prepared & store in a are tight container?? If so how long would the shelf life be & does it need to be refrigerated??

      1. Hello Marisol! If you want to make the mask ahead of time, you certainly can, but you’ll have to store it in the fridge if you’re using water-based ingredients to mix in. If you moisturize the powder with oils, you won’t need to refrigerate; but if you’re using rosewater, milk, yogurt, plain water, etc., you’ll definitely want to keep it in the fridge and use within a couple of weeks. Anytime you introduce water to a product without a strong preservative, you’ll need to keep it in the fridge and use it quickly, just like you’d do for leftover food.

        It’s a really lovely mask, so I hope you enjoy it when you make it!